My Blog
By OLD TOWN DENTISTRY
January 22, 2021
Category: Oral Health
Tags: Dental Cleaning  

"If you've been putting it off, it may be time to schedule one. When life gets busy it's easy to forget, especially if you've been doing everything right at home, brushing and flossing daily. But it's important to make professional dental cleanings part of your dental health habits so you can avoid the damaging effects of plaque. This is even more important if your dental hygiene has lapsed at home. To learn more contact, Dr. Frinet Kasper of Old Town Dentistry, in Alexandria, VA.


The Plaque You Leave Behind

Your mouth is home to bacteria that find their way inside through the food you eat and the air you breathe. The film that forms over the surface of your teeth every day is called plaque, and it is made up of millions of these bacteria. They're the reason for daily brushing and flossing, as plaque can harden and turn into tartar, which is extremely difficult to remove at home.

Even if you do a thorough job, there is usually some plaque left over. This is especially true if your teeth are misaligned or you have dental problems that create hard to reach spots. The bacteria that remain can wear away the enamel on your teeth and can cause complications like gum disease.
 

Dental Cleanings in Alexandria, VA

A professional dental cleaning can remove the accumulated tartar from your teeth. Just as you brush your teeth every day to keep plaque at bay, having your teeth professionally cleaned every six months helps keep tartar under control, and may even reverse gum disease in its early stages.

But beyond assisting with your dental hygiene, an important step in preventing cavities and gum disease, your dentist also examines your teeth to diagnose and treat problems before more invasive techniques are necessary.

To make your appointment today call Dr. Kasper of Old Town Dentistry in Alexandria, VA, at (703) 683-0800. Or, go to our website at www.oldtowndentistry.com.

 

 

KevinBaconsMango-SlicingTrickandOtherWaystoRidFoodBetweenYourTeeth

During the COVID-19 quarantines, stir-crazy celebrities have been creating some “unique” home videos—like Madonna singing about fried fish to the tune of “Vogue” in her bathroom or Cardi B busting through a human-sized Jenga tower. But an entertaining Instagram video from Kevin Bacon also came with a handy culinary tip: The just-awakened film and TV actor showed fans his morning technique for cutting a mango to avoid the stringy pulp that gets between your teeth. After cutting a mango in half, he scored it lengthwise and crosswise to create squares and then turned the mango inside out for easy eating.

With his mango-slicing video garnering over a quarter-million views, the City on a Hill star may have touched a nerve—the near universal annoyance we all have with food stuck between our teeth. Trapped food particles aren't only annoying, they can also contribute to a bacterial film called dental plaque that's the top cause for tooth decay and gum disease.

Unfortunately, it's nearly impossible to avoid stuck food if you love things like popcorn, poppy-seed muffins or barbecue ribs. It's helpful then to have a few go-to ways for removing food caught between teeth. First, though, let's talk about what NOT to use to loosen a piece of stuck food.

A recent survey of more than 1,000 adults found that when removing something caught between our teeth, we humans are a creative lot. The makeshift tools that survey respondents said they've used in a pinch included twigs, safety pins, screwdrivers and nails (both the hammer and finger/toe variety). Although clever, many such items are both unsanitary and harmful to your gums and tooth enamel, especially if they're metallic or abrasive.

If you want a safe way to remove unwanted food debris, try these methods instead:

Brush your teeth: The gentle abrasives in toothpaste plus the mechanical action of brushing can help dislodge trapped food.

Use dental floss: A little bit of dental floss usually does the trick to remove wedged-in food—and it's easy to carry a small floss container or a floss pick on you for emergencies.

Try a toothpick. A toothpick is also an appropriate food-removing tool, according the American Dental Association, as long as it is rounded and made of wood.

See your dentist. We have the tools to safely and effectively remove trapped food debris that you haven't been able to dislodge by other means—so before you get desperate, give us a call.

You can also minimize plaque buildup from food particles between teeth by both brushing and flossing every day. And for optimally clean teeth, be sure you have regular dental office cleanings at least twice a year.

Thanks to Kevin Bacon's little trick, you can have your “non-stringy” mango and eat it too. Still, you can't always avoid food getting wedged between your teeth, so be prepared.

If you would like more information about effective oral hygiene practices, please contact us or schedule a consultation. To learn more, read the Dear Doctor magazine article “Daily Oral Hygiene.”

By Old Town Dentistry
January 11, 2021
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral hygiene   oral health  
HerestoHealthySmilesin2021

A New Year's resolution can be just about anything, from losing weight to visiting every major league baseball park. But a resolution you're more likely to keep ought to have two things going for it: It's doable and it changes your life for the better. Here's one that meets those criteria—taking better care of your smile. So we hope that made your 2021 list.

Resolving to pursue more committed dental care can have a double benefit. It can improve your dental health and it could help you gain a more attractive smile. What's more, it's not hard to do—it takes only about five minutes of your time each day, along with a couple of dental visits a year.

Here's how you can make better smile care in 2021 one of your best New Year's resolutions ever.

Brush and floss daily. Your mouth's biggest enemy is dental plaque, a thin film of bacteria and food particles on tooth surfaces. The bacteria in plaque can cause both tooth decay and gum disease. But by removing accumulated plaque with brushing and flossing, you can drastically reduce your risk for dental disease. The key is to do it every day without fail—no holidays!

Have your teeth cleaned. Even if you're an oral hygiene ninja, you can still miss some plaque, which may then harden into calculus (or tartar). This calcified form (which is just as harmful as softer plaque) is nearly impossible to remove by brushing or flossing. But we can at the dental office—which is why having your teeth professionally cleaned every six months makes it even less likely you'll encounter dental disease.

Give your teeth a better diet. If you're also resolving to eat more nutritiously, here's an extra incentive: Your diet can impact your dental health. On one hand, diets high in certain carbohydrates (particularly sugar) increase your risk for disease. On the other hand, a balanced diet of fresh fruits and vegetables, whole grains, and dairy products can strengthen your teeth and help them stay healthy.

Update your dental work. You may have fillings, crowns or bridges that fixed a dental problem in the past but may have since fallen into disrepair. If so, now is the time to update them—and putting it off could increase your risk for disease or other serious dental problems. Taking care of needed renovations to older dental work promotes better oral health, and may also improve your smile.

Want to start the New Year off right in regard to your teeth and gums? See us for a complete checkup and evaluation of your dental health. Together, we can develop just the right care plan to help you achieve your resolution of a healthier mouth and a more attractive smile.

If you would like more information about effective dental care, please contact us or schedule a consultation. To learn more, read the Dear Doctor magazine article “Daily Oral Hygiene.”

By Old Town Dentistry
January 01, 2021
Category: Oral Health
Tags: canker sore  
YouDonthavetoSufferfromIrritatingCankerSores

We've all had them — tiny sores that pop up seemingly out of nowhere under the tongue or the inside of the cheek. They're named aphthous ulcers, but are more commonly known as canker sores. For some people, they can be a recurring irritation.

Round with a yellow-gray center surrounded by reddened skin, aphthous ulcers seem to coincide with periods of anxiety or stress, or as a result of some minor trauma. Many people will feel a tingling or painful sensation a few hours or days before the ulcers appear. Once they appear they usually persist for a week to ten days before finally drying and healing. In the meantime they can be painful, especially while eating or drinking.

One form known as recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) affects about a quarter of the population with outbreaks of multiple ulcers that occur regularly. RAS ulcers are usually one centimeter or more in size — the larger the sore the more painful they tend to be.

There are ways to ease the discomfort of an ulcer outbreak and help hasten their healing. A number of over-the-counter products can be used in minor cases to numb the area temporarily and cover it to facilitate healing. We can also apply steroids or inject other medications for more severe cases. You may also find curbing your eating of certain foods like tomato sauce, citrus or spicy dishes can help.

For the most part aphthous ulcers aren't dangerous. In some situations, though, you should seek dental or medical evaluation: a sore that doesn't heal within two weeks; increases in severity, frequency or duration of ulcers; or when you don't seem to ever be without an ulcer in your mouth. We may need to perform tests, including tissue biopsy, to make sure there aren't any underlying systemic conditions causing the ulcers.

More than likely, though, you'll only need relief from the aggravation caused by aphthous ulcers. Among the many remedies, there's one right for you.

If you would like more information on aphthous ulcers or other mouth sores, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Mouth Sores.”

By Old Town Dentistry
December 22, 2020
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral health  
ThisOddTongueConditionIsntSomethingToFretOver

If you're intrigued by the strange and bizarre, here's one to pique your interest: geographic tongue. It's a rare condition that causes the appearance of red patches on the tongue surface, surrounded by grayish-white borders, and which look a lot like continents on a map (hence the name). But although it may look odd, geographic tongue won't harm your health.

The condition is also known as benign migratory glossitis, so named because it's not cancerous and the patches seem to move or “migrate” around the tongue surface. The most common causes are thought to be stress or hormonal disruptions in those predisposed to the condition. Many researchers believe zinc or vitamin B deficiencies in the body contribute to its occurrence. It also seems more prevalent among non-smokers and pregnant women, as well as occurring as a family trait.

The red patches are created by the temporary disappearance of some of the papillae, tiny bumps on the tongue's top surface. The patches can abruptly appear during a flareup and then disappear just as suddenly. But as “angry” as the patches may look, geographic tongue is not considered a health danger. It isn't normally painful, although people can experience stinging or numbing sensations emanating from the patches that can be mildly uncomfortable.

Because it's also rare, you're not likely to encounter it personally. But if you or a loved one does begin to notice red patches on the tongue, there are a few things you can do to lessen any accompanying irritation. For one, cut out foods like tomatoes, citrus fruits, eggplant, mint or highly spicy or acidic foods, all of which have been known to increase discomfort. You might also avoid astringents like alcohol or mouthwashes that likewise irritate the patches when they occur.

Although geographic tongue can't be cured, your dentist can help you manage symptoms when they arise with the help of prescribed anesthetic mouthwashes, antihistamines or steroid lozenges. These not only can help lower any discomfort or irritations, they may also lessen the duration of a flareup.

For the most part, geographic tongue usually causes more embarrassment than physical discomfort. But with a little help from your dentist, you can keep it to a minimum. Geographic tongue may be odd, but it's nothing to worry about.

If you would like more information on geographic tongue, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Geographic Tongue: No Cause For Alarm.”





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